"Worlds On Fire" - The Butterfly Effect, Final Conversation of Kings (2008)
There are some songs, as my Music Director puts it, that are Epic Songs. Epic Songs that fill you up with such a feeling of fullness and unexplainable satisfaction, wonder and joy. They must be executed befittingly, for the audience to be able to fully immerse themselves in it and must be done with such amazing musicality and combination of different textures, so that all layers can be felt right through to the listeners’ nerves. He was talking about the 1812 Overture. I found it in The Butterfly Effect’s “Worlds On Fire.”
The subtle and tense beginning doesn’t go on for such an amount of time, that you eventually let go of the anticipation you have when you first listen to a song, to that first chord, that first note. Puddles’ delicate notes on his guitar are smooth enough to float over Esmond’s vocals, working with his [Esmond’s] warm tone, both complimenting and contrasting it.   The build up within the song is gradual, but not slow. The dynamics move up and over, like a tide ebbing onto and away from the shore, before you realise that all instruments, all aspects and elements of the song have combined into one epic mix to pronounce that our worlds are on fire.
The intensity in the first chorus implores you to feel his contained and whole, but still fierce anger. Esmond’s words almost carry a spitefulness aimed at someone who has left him; his lyrics cut through you as a listener and the notes on the guitars lift your soul up out of you. The drums and bass become your heartbeat; the more the volume is turned up, the more you feel it pumping in your rib cage. The band’s inclusion of a brass section is applaud-worthy, in itself, giving the song an almost majestic and unique emotion.
There is a pause, just mast the middle of the track, that can almost be called the “calm after the storm” and for a moment, it fools the listener into thinking that it has finished, and you almost feel yourself unsatisfied with the song that has been handed to you. The band, though, have yet to disappoint, and the guitars and brass continue, like the winds from a tsunami’s aftermath. The vocals break through again, accompanied with a lighter touch on the drums, before the entire band resume with their original magnitude, if not, more. 
The instrumental, that leads up to the finish, attacks with such immersible ferocity. Each note and timbre encases your sense of hearing, until every agent in the song rejoins and claims you in its final whirlwind. This last chorus travels and spins into the end, where it leaves you overwhelmed and thrown back to a calm that you almost forgot about.
Some will think I have dramatacized The Butterfly Effect's musicality. They may even believe I have over-romanticised Worlds On Fire. That doesn’t matter. In it’s own right, like in the right of many other songs, this fits amongst one of the greats. It is, as I now call very few pieces, an Epic Song.
(Source: notesweremadetobebent)

"Worlds On Fire" - The Butterfly Effect, Final Conversation of Kings (2008)


There are some songs, as my Music Director puts it, that are Epic Songs. Epic Songs that fill you up with such a feeling of fullness and unexplainable satisfaction, wonder and joy. They must be executed befittingly, for the audience to be able to fully immerse themselves in it and must be done with such amazing musicality and combination of different textures, so that all layers can be felt right through to the listeners’ nerves. He was talking about the 1812 Overture. I found it in The Butterfly Effect’s “Worlds On Fire.”

The subtle and tense beginning doesn’t go on for such an amount of time, that you eventually let go of the anticipation you have when you first listen to a song, to that first chord, that first note. Puddles’ delicate notes on his guitar are smooth enough to float over Esmond’s vocals, working with his [Esmond’s] warm tone, both complimenting and contrasting it.
   The build up within the song is gradual, but not slow. The dynamics move up and over, like a tide ebbing onto and away from the shore, before you realise that all instruments, all aspects and elements of the song have combined into one epic mix to pronounce that our worlds are on fire.

The intensity in the first chorus implores you to feel his contained and whole, but still fierce anger. Esmond’s words almost carry a spitefulness aimed at someone who has left him; his lyrics cut through you as a listener and the notes on the guitars lift your soul up out of you. The drums and bass become your heartbeat; the more the volume is turned up, the more you feel it pumping in your rib cage. The band’s inclusion of a brass section is applaud-worthy, in itself, giving the song an almost majestic and unique emotion.

There is a pause, just mast the middle of the track, that can almost be called the “calm after the storm” and for a moment, it fools the listener into thinking that it has finished, and you almost feel yourself unsatisfied with the song that has been handed to you. The band, though, have yet to disappoint, and the guitars and brass continue, like the winds from a tsunami’s aftermath. The vocals break through again, accompanied with a lighter touch on the drums, before the entire band resume with their original magnitude, if not, more.

The instrumental, that leads up to the finish, attacks with such immersible ferocity. Each note and timbre encases your sense of hearing, until every agent in the song rejoins and claims you in its final whirlwind. This last chorus travels and spins into the end, where it leaves you overwhelmed and thrown back to a calm that you almost forgot about.

Some will think I have dramatacized The Butterfly Effect's musicality. They may even believe I have over-romanticised Worlds On Fire. That doesn’t matter. In it’s own right, like in the right of many other songs, this fits amongst one of the greats. It is, as I now call very few pieces, an Epic Song.

(Source: notesweremadetobebent)

Worlds On Fire The Butterfly Effect Music Review musicreview its a really shoddy review done on a Friday afternoon I'm just really tired ok

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